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Portrait Of Australian Artist Sonia Payes, By Ilona Nelson For This Wild Song

Sonia Payes | Portrait by Ilona Nelson

Sonia Payes

Portrait of Australian artist Sonia Payes, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song
Portrait of Australian artist Sonia Payes, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song

About Sonia

Sonia Payes is a conceptually-based artist working with several mediums including photography, multi-media, animation and sculpture.  A strong environmental narrative permeates Payes’ works and the cycle of re-creation is explored in her wildly dystopian landscapes.

Her works are held in numerous public galleries in Australia and prestigious private collections in Australia, Shanghai, Beijing, Switzerland and Belgium.

Payes was born and resides in Melbourne, Australia.

Sonia Payes’ artwork

Interview with Sonia Payes

How do you describe your work to others?
Futuristic and dystopian, almost apocalyptic/dark

Do you have a preferred medium?
Photography and now sculpture which is all derived from my photographic work.

How do you begin new work?
I always have too many ideas. I always feel that ‘new work’ is really work that I didn’t complete for my last show. I actually have a table top full of notes and scribbles of what my next idea is. Then I cut and paste to create a mock up just for me to see if I like it, if it’s sculpture, otherwise I print up works and blu tac them to my studio walls to see if I like the images day after day.

Do you tend to work in series or do you see your body of work as a continuation?
Oh definitely both!! My landscapes are a series of worlds, my worlds, but they are all a continuation just as life is a continuation.

What attracts you to your subjects?
Humanity in general. People living within their environment. Portraits and landscapes are all about the surrounding environment. The variety of life, the endless changing landscape of our world.

What processes do you use to bring your ideas to life?
My imagination, using my camera, pen, paper, scissors well before time spent using computer programmes.

What do you use as reference material?
My imagination, my family, my world, travel, museums.

Do you work intuitively or more consciously?
Definitely intuitively. When I started shooting portraits, the light and shadows all made so much clear sense to me without even having to work at it. My training taught me how to understand the old masters and how they used window light. There was no turning back for me. The light is what makes my work sing. The images (most of the images) have the depth in them that the light is the clear focus.

What’s your favourite colour to work with?
Colour? What’s that? Colour… very dark blue.
Tones … black, grey, all shades of dark.

Where do you create?
Permanently in my head. Every design I see, wherever I go I can see possibilities to adapt ideas to the presentation of my work.
Mostly at my studio. I also spend time with my computer genius, my foundary guys etc .

Do you have a studio ritual to start the session?
Always clean up first then start.

What’s your favourite music to work to?
Need the sounds of silence, I crave that.

Do you enjoy coming up with titles?
No
Don’t like the idea of actually naming work but I do.
Don’t like putting ideas into the viewer head before they make their own.

What’s your favourite part of creating?
Showing my finished work to people.

What advice would you give to your emerging self?
Do a business course first.

Have you ever worked with a mentor?
Not in the true sense but I am open to opinions from my art friends.

How do you alleviate the down times?
Gym, sleep and more sleep and food.

What defining moments have you experienced within your practice?
Winning art prizes … best feeling ever.

What is the most memorable exhibition or artwork you have seen and why?
Richard Avedon in London about 17 years ago because the portraits were larger than life at eye level and extremely confronting.

If you could ask any artist any question, what would it be?
Want to swap work?

What does the future hold for you?
Growing family and a growing body of work spanning over many countries.

Sonia’s website

Town Hall Gallery, Hawthorn

Make a tax deductible donation by June 30!

Donate now to support our exhibition

We have an upcoming exhibition at Town Hall Gallery in September, featuring over 50 works, including TWS portraits. We’re currently finalising the portraits and art works and a talented exhibition designer is bringing it all together to create a powerful show.

For the month of June you have the opportunity to support the exhibition and make a tax deductible donation before the the financial year ends. Your support not only helps us to realise this exhibition but also provides support to the 100+ artists a part of TWS.

With thanks to support from Town Hall Gallery and printing sponsorship from Arten, we now only need to raise a minimum of $7,000 to cover the costs of producing the portraits.

MAKE A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION BY JUNE 30

Portrait Of Australian Artist Cat Rabbit, By Ilona Nelson For This Wild Song

Cat Rabbit | Portrait by Ilona Nelson

Cat Rabbit

Portrait of Australian artist Cat Rabbit, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song
Portrait of Australian artist Cat Rabbit, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song

About Cat

Cat Rabbit is a Melbourne based textile artist and designer. Cat works between a fluff-filled home studio with her cat, Porco, and a cosy space in the Nicholas Building. She makes plush sculptural works of her imagined characters and the worlds they might live in.

Cat also makes books for children and other fantastical artworks with her collaborator Isobel Knowles under the name Soft Stories.

Cat’s artwork

Interview with Cat Rabbit

How do you describe your work to others?
I usually just show them a picture (:

Do you have a preferred medium?
Felt! Any felt. I just love how versatile and forgiving it is. I have also become enamored with wool roving, which I suppose is just felt that’s taken a step backwards – it has so much potential! It can be moulded and sculpted into almost any form using wet or dry felting techniques.

How do you begin new work?
The process differs depending on what I’m making. If it’s a character for commission or particular purpose, I will sketch it out first to work out what features I will emphasise and how it might be structured. If it’s a needle felted blob (like the piece I just started) I just let it evolve.

Do you tend to work in series or do you see your body of work as a continuation?
Always a continuation.

What attracts you to your subjects?
I have always been a fan of animals of any kind (with the exception of mice – I’m sure they are nice but they make me nervous for some reason that I can’t explain). Since childhood I have imagined animals living these secret lives with human characteristics and everyday occupations. I am also a big fan of food, and have lately been giving faces to egg yolks and apples. There’s something about giving life to the everyday things that I appreciate, so they turn into little encouraging mascots that help you through the day to day.

What processes do you use to bring your ideas to life?
I usually follow a gradual process of adding, cutting and shutting.I have a bank of felt shape knowledge in my head to draw from, so I just add bits on, like building with felt and cotton. I like this process, as it tends to be more organic and less structured – I don’t get too worried if it doesn’t go according to plan because there is no plan.A bit like my life.

What do you use as reference material?
I don’t tend to work from physical references too much.I like to work from memory be-cause it has a funnier, more naive result.

Do you work intuitively or more consciously?
Definitely intuitive.I make a base for the basic shape that I would like, then add on bits as I go.I guess it’s more of a sculptural process, I cut and add and remove along the way.

What’s your favourite colour to work with?
This changes daily. Today I am very excited about grassy green, particularly when paired with a nice candy pink.

Where do you create?
I do most of my sewing and felting in my home studio, under the strict supervision of my cat, Porco. My digital and photography work is done in my shared studio in the Nicholas Building.

Do you have a studio ritual to start the session?
Cup of tea and BBC 6 music radio. Put my phone as far away as possible, and keep Porco as close as possible.

What’s your favourite music to work to?
I like a variety! Particularly radio shows where people can introduce me to new (or new to me) things. I have an archive of Jarvis Cocker’s Sunday service (his radio show from BBC6 music) that I always fall back on when in need. Jarvis has a wonderful soothing voice and reads excerpts from interesting books (Moomin!), and lots of intriguing music.

Do you enjoy coming up with titles?
Sometimes I know the title the entire time, but others it’s a struggle and I have to look through a dictionary or my iTunes playlist.

What’s your favourite part of creating?
Sewing has always been a meditation for me. I came back to it at University when I was stressed and needed to do something completely different (ie not reading) and it has continued to be the thing that keeps my anxieties at bay, keeps me feeling peaceful.

What advice would you give to your emerging self?
Give yourself a break, little Cat! Things will happen. Life is short. Read more books.

How do you alleviate the down times?
I just keep making things! But I try to make them with no real plan or agenda – just experiment. I find it the most invigorating thing and it always leads to a good place. I have learned that the down times are nearly always fleeting and I try to enjoy them for what they are and the peace and quiet these times can provide – not get too distracted by those nagging little self doubt demons that niggle when you’re down.

What defining moments have you experienced within your practice?
Being able to capture my pieces via photography has somehow made me more proud than anything – it used to be a constant frustration for me and I am slowly becoming better at it. I guess being able to record your work is important, and it can be a tricky thing for craft practitioners.

What is the most memorable exhibition or artwork you have seen and why?
I was studying in London for a couple of months when I was in my early 20’s. I had no money, and wasn’t very good at making new friends, but the galleries were all free and I visited them daily. I was at the Tate Britain and walked into the room with ‘The Lady of Shalott’ by John William Waterhouse and I had to have a sit down and was planted there for a good half an hour, just taking it in. It’s huge, beautiful and so emotive. It also brought back memories of one of my favourite scenes from Anne of Green Gables where Anne recites Tennyson’s poem of the same name and floats herself downstream, nearly
drowning (in a comical way). I went back to sit with the painting many times before I left London.

If you could ask any artist any question, what would it be?
I’m not sure if I have any particular questions, but I’d love to have a good old chat to Beatrix Potter about gardening and mushrooms.

What does the future hold for you?
I try not to look too far into the future. But I know the immediate future involves a cup of tea and a biscuit and that’s good enough for me.

Cat’s website

This Wild Song, Podcast Graphic

This Wild Song Podcast: first three episodes live!

Our first three podcasts are live

We are very excited to announce that the TWS Podcast is now LIVE!!

This podcast is a series of honest conversations with TWS artists about art, business and life. We address the practicalities and realities of being a professional artist, and the ‘business’ of art.

Designed as a resource for artists, we answer your questions such as how do you support your arts practice financially? How important is an arts education? How do you structure your days? Plus we also discuss representation, self promotion, motherhood, self care and share advice for emerging artists.

Our first episodes are:
001 This Wild Song – An introduction
002 Art education and what Erika Gofton wishes she had known
003 Art, motherhood and life with Lily Mae Martin
With new episodes being released every two weeks

We welcome your input and if there’s any questions you’d like to be answered in these interviews please send them through to hello@thiswildsong.com.au

Portrait Of Australian Artist Indigo O'Rourke, By Ilona Nelson For This Wild Song

Indigo O’Rourke | Portrait by Ilona Nelson

Indigo O’Rourke

Portrait of Australian artist Indigo O'Rourke, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song
Portrait of Australian artist Indigo O'Rourke, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song

About Indigo

Indigo O’Rourke is a visual artist working predominately between drawing and painting.  Her work focuses primarily on social and political issues in today’s climate.

She currently lives and works in Melbourne.

Indigo’s artwork

Interview with Indigo O’Rourke

How do you describe your work to others?
In recent years I would say, “realistic biro drawings”.

Do you have a preferred medium?
Biro at the moment, moving back to coloured pencils for my next show.  Drawing is the most innate medium for me.  I also write, sew, paint and make collage.

How do you begin new work?
I’m always working, whether sketching or writing.  If I’m working on an exhibition I usually have a clear concept and go from there.

Do you tend to work in a series or do you see your body of work as a continuation?
Both.  Sometimes I like to put projects to bed, particularly if they have been years in the making or a particularly heavy concept, I won’t revisit those projects.  I do have some things ongoing which seem like they could continue forever.

What attracts you to your subjects?
I usually work within a research based practice often building narratives from social and political issues.  My last show was about homelessness and the one prior to that was about suicide.

What do you use as reference material?
I take a lot of photos both digital and film.

Where do you create?
At home in my studio is where I execute the work.  If some of the works are small I will take them away on weekends or occasionally to my day job.

Do you have a studio ritual to start the session?
Not really.  I make sure my dog is well exercised so he doesn’t bother me too much 🙂  I like to have podcasts ready to go – Conversations with Richard Fidler, Casefile, Trace, Australian True Crime, Radio National law report, and I often stream stand-up comedy to lighten the load!

Do you enjoy coming up with titles?
The titles come up with themselves!  If I have to think too much about a title it probably doesn’t need one.

What advice would you give to your emerging self?
F*ck what anyone else thinks.  Keep making.

Have you ever worked with a mentor?
I have many artist friends who I admire. I love to shoot the breeze and talk about processes with them.  I lived a few doors down from my favourite living artist Richard Lewer.  I loved our conversations, I would look to him as a mentor sometimes.

How do you alleviate the down times?
I’m lucky that I don’t suffer from post exhibition blues.  I have many friends that do.  I feel liberated once an exhibition is over I just get stuck straight into the next one.  I’m always making or writing and working with my moods so I never really come off the treadmill.

What does the future hold for you?
Nobody knows the answer to this question, I’m excited by that!

I am studying paramedicine so perhaps my next body of work will be influenced by that new career path; we will have to wait and see.

Indigo’s website

Portrait Of Australian Artist Kate Rohde, By Ilona Nelson For This Wild Song

Kate Rohde | Portrait by Ilona Nelson

Kate Rohde

Portrait of Australian artist Kate Rohde, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song
Portrait of Australian artist Kate Rohde, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song

About Kate

Kate Rohde’s sculptures and installations reference 16th century ‘wunderkammers’ or cabinets of curiosity. Created using synthetic mass-produced materials they investigate the disposable nature of society, raising questions about contemporary values, excess and extinction.

Rohde’s work has been exhibited in major institutional exhibitions, most recently the Adelaide Biennial 2016, and is held in collections including the National Gallery of Victoria, Heide Museum of Art, Powerhouse Museum and Art Gallery of South Australia.

Kate’s biography copyright THIS IS NO FANTASY

Kate’s artwork

Interview with Kate Rohde

How do you describe your work to others?
I generally sum it up as the natural history museum on acid, which neatly encapsulates it I think.

Do you have a preferred medium or use whatever is needed to express your ideas?
The last few years I’ve used a lot of resin, but in the past I’ve incorporated a lot of craft oriented materials into my work. I tend to use what’s going to get the job done, but that said I definitely feel an affinity for certain materials more than others.

How do you begin new work?
I often do ‘research’ to begin with which is just looking at books, making notes and little, simple sketches. The hardest part is always getting started, and the nature of my work means there’s often a bit of technical phaffing about, making frames or armatures in preparation for the sculpting, but it’s a good momentum builder and helps to get things underway.

Do you tend to work in series or do you see your body of work as a continuation?
I would generally describe myself as a project based artist, I really work towards whatever the particular outcome is. That said I think there’s a thread that continues from project to project, so if you look back over several bodies of work they will have a feeling of continuity. Often it takes a few shows to get certain ideas or directions out of my system.

What attracts you to your subjects?
I love the patterns and colours in nature, particularly really strong graphic patterns like leopard print and zebra stripe, and just the amazing variety of textures and shapes in the natural world.

What processes do you use to bring your ideas to life?
I do a lot of sculpting in plasticine these days, that’s really the starting point in the resin casting process. It also ends up entailing a fair amount of time using power tools, and I also do a lot of building and assembly type stuff. I’ve gotten a lot better at it over the years through trial and error! I love the process of being in the making of work and the challenge of it.

What do you use as reference material, if any.
I use a lot of books as reference material, old National Geographics – which I have quite a collection of – old nature coffee table books or educational series. I like books of a particular era, around the 1960’s-70’s as the colours seem to be printed in an unreal super saturated way and they also often have beautiful painted illustrations which I love.

Are you conscious of the meaning of the work initially or do you work intuitively?
I work fairly intuitively, I think of my work as bringing into existence the objects my dream home would be filled with and that I’d want to live with. I feel the meaning is quite open ended for others interpretation. I know what it means to me but I leave it up to others to project onto it what they will.

Do you aim to create the finished piece exactly as you envisioned or enjoy allowing it to develop organically?
I work out a lot of stuff in the making process so I leave a fair amount of space for it to develop organically. I do a very rough simple sketch in the beginning to capture the gist of it and go from there.

What’s your favourite colour to work with?
Aqua has always been my favourite, when I was little I’d always single it out in my pencil sets and it would be the shortest, most used pencil.

Where do you create?
I’m lucky to have a big warehouse studio space to work in, it’s perfect as I need a lot of room to sprawl out and not be too precious about getting resin drips on the floor.

Do you have a studio ritual to start the session?
Not really, since having my son any time in the studio is precious, so I really get straight down to work. Before I go into the studio I mentally sort through what I’m up to so I know exactly where to begin.

What’s your favourite music to work to?
I listen to podcasts rather than music, I have quite an extended roster of programs I like to listen to so I cycle through those as I work. My all time favourite is probably Conversations from ABC radio.

Do you enjoy coming up with titles?
Not really, I always end up calling my works something really boring and descriptive. I really admire people like Del Kathryn Barton and Dale Frank who come up with really poetic and crazy titles.

What’s your favourite part of creating?
I really enjoy the plasticine sculpting the most as it’s the most creative and challenging part of it.

What advice would you give to your emerging self?
Just keep going, but with a strong dose of realism that you may always need a part-time job.

Have you ever had a mentor?
When I was a teenager my family became friendly with a couple who lived on the same street as us. Jo had done both a design and fine art degree so I looked to her for advice on art and art school. Another art school friend of hers also was very helpful, and both of them took me to a number of contemporary art exhibitions which really helped a lot when I was interviewing to get accepted into courses at the end of high school. Just knowing a little about the local galleries and artists was very good and being able to talk to someone about art, as my family was very removed from that world.

How do you alleviate the down times?
I think the best thing to do is just keep working, even if it feels very unproductive, it’s better to do something rather than nothing. I often tidy or reorganise my studio at these times as it seems to help to mentally prepare to start a new body of work.

What defining moments have you experienced within your practice?
Deciding to do a fine art degree rather than design degree when I finished high school.

My first interstate exhibition after finishing uni which lead to my first show in a commercial gallery. It was a very small piece in a group show but it set in motion a chain of events that really helped get off that first rung of the art world ladder.

Being selected for Melbourne Now in the design rather than art section – it felt a bit strange as I never felt like I was a design person, but it opened up some new doors for me and lead to several new opportunities. It made me realise my practice could be really fluid and move between art, craft and design really comfortably.

Kate’s website

Portrait Of Australian Artist Erika Gofton, By Ilona Nelson For This Wild Song

Erika Gofton | Portrait by Ilona Nelson

Erika Gofton

Portrait of Australian artist Erika Gofton, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song
Portrait of Australian artist Erika Gofton, by Ilona Nelson for This Wild Song

About Erika

Erika Gofton is a Melbourne based artist and has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and Post Graduate Diploma of Education from the University of Tasmania. She has held solo exhibitions in Melbourne, Sydney and Queensland and has exhibited in numerous group and curated shows. In 2012 Erika won the Toyota Community Spirit Travel Grant and undertook a residency in New York at Point B Worklodge. Whilst in New York she received a scholarship to complete the Drawing Marathon at The New York Studio School.

Erika has been a finalist in numerous prizes including the Collie, Wyndam Art Prize, Adelaide Perry Prize for Drawing, Paul Guest Prize, EMSLA, Sunshine Coast Art Prize, Mosman Art Prize, R & M McGivern Prize. She’s also been selected in the Redland Art Prize twice, three times in the City of Albany Art Prize, winning Peoples Choice in 2012, and Williamstown Contemporary Art Prize six times. Erika is represented by Dickerson Gallery in Sydney.

Erika is also the founder and Director of The Art Room, an art class, workshop and mentoring facility in Footscray, Melbourne.

Erika Gofton’s artwork

Interview with Erika Gofton

How do you describe your work to others?
Not very well I’m afraid! I do struggle to describe it because I want it to defy verbal description. I really want my work to have an empathetic conversation with the with the viewer on a more visceral level. I am interested in the power an image has to communicate something beyond words and to act as a conduit or maybe even a translator between the artist and the viewer.

But I generally say that it essentially explores empathy, anxiety and contradiction. It is very personal work and really have grown out of my need to understand the intersubjective relationship of mother and child. I want the work to sit somewhat precariously between the light and the dark, the beautiful and the ugly, the conspicuous and the ambiguous. I like that it can be one thing at the same time that it is something else.

Do you have a preferred medium?
When I’m drawing I’m in my happy place! I love everything about it, from doodling to working on a more sustained resolved drawing. It makes me think and see more clearly and honestly. I love painting too but have a more complicated relationship with it. Painting always feels like more of a negotiation and sometimes an argument. One that sometimes I win and sometimes I don’t. But l also love that about it, it feels like I constantly have to be ready to negotiate, to be on my toes.

Do you tend to work in series or do you see your body of work as a continuation?
I generally tend to work in series making works that have a conversation with each other rather than one work in isolation. There is a very clear thread that I have followed through my work from the last 10 years or so that has connected each body of work. As the work is about my own experiences, that conversation has evolved as my experiences have.

What attracts you to your subjects?
My subjects come from my personal experience and my desire to tease apart and understand the questions I have about those experiences. I have been working with images of children as my main subject for quite a while, not just purely as a way to connect to and understand the experience of motherhood but also as a subject that can have a strong connection and evoke a compelling response in the viewer. I have always been interested in creating a quiet tension within my work and using birds allowed me to connect to that tension, and also speak of instinct and fragility. In more recent times the plastic bags have given me a way to confront the tension in a more direct way and asks the question “what if?” without providing a conclusive answer.

What processes do you use to bring your ideas to life?
Initially I write a lot in my journal as it helps me to brain dump and get my ideas out of my head into a space that I can understand them and visualise them more clearly. I sometimes have trouble sleeping so a journal by my bed allows me to capture those ideas and thoughts that keep me awake. Once I feel I have a visual form for my ideas I will draw and take photos. Photography is an important part of my practice, it forms the more planned stage and initially gives a visual form to my ideas. Then the painting or drawing is my translation of that. Drawing is crucial in my process as it is my way of interrogating and understanding the subject.

Do you work intuitively or more consciously?
Both I think, and I think it shifts back and forth all the time. I certainly start by working more intuitively in the beginning when I am visualising the image that I want to create but then I have to be more conscious in the process itself. It then becomes more intuitive again as I make decisions through the material itself and what the work demands of me. The kind of decisions it needs me to make come back to intuitive ones.

What’s your favourite colour to work with?
I love Payne’s Grey, funnily, though I actually don’t use it that much.

Where do you create?
I have a studio in Footscray that is within the Art school that I run. It is a separate space away from the main teaching space but I am always backwards and forwards between the two. I’ve had to be very strict that my studio is a very private space and is not accessible to the students as I need to be able to make work unselfconsciously.

Do you have a studio ritual to start the session?
I generally try to exercise early and then head for a coffee to a local café to tackle emails so that I can focus during the day without distraction… I try anyway! When I get into the studio I’ll spend 10 minutes tidying up, I can’t work in chaos, and then I’ll get stuck in.

What’s your favourite music to work to?
I actually don’t listen to music very often in the studio. I either have complete silence or listen to podcasts, audio books or maybe Radio National. It kind of depends on where my head is at at the time. I do love a good true crime podcast!

Do you enjoy coming up with titles?
I have a love hate relationship with coming up with titles. I feel sad that I used a lot of my good titles years ago! I like titles to have a poetry to them and a bit of ambiguity.

What’s your favourite part of creating?
I generally love the beginning of a work where it is about exploration and discovery, and then the end where it is about resolving and clarifying what I am trying to do and say. The middle always feels like a bit of a battle that I just put my head down and fight my way through.

What advice would you give to your emerging self?
Don’t worry about what others think just make your most honest sincere work
Be critical but not judgmental
Take risks and don’t be afraid to make lots of bad work
Find your people!
There is not one perfect example of an art’s practice; they all vary artist to artist, if you can’t or don’t work in the studio every day because you have to make a living or raise a family that doesn’t make you a lesser artist
You’re in it for the long haul so just be patient

Have you ever worked with a mentor?
Not ‘officially’ but I have a few incredible women around me who have really inspired and challenged me as an artist and I really see them as my mentors, they make me want to work harder, take risks, be more generous and be a better artist.

How do you alleviate the down times?
Teach. I love teaching and I feel that it really helps me to reconcile those times, it allows me to keep making without the pressure of an end but also gives me an opportunity to get outside my own head.

What defining moments have you experienced within your practice?
Moving to Melbourne in 2000 definitely was really a pivotal point for me, to be in a new welcoming community of artists.

I did a residency in New York in 2013 which enabled me to really clarify what I wanted to make work about and gave me the confidence to take risks.

Then I think there are lots of other little moments. Conversations with artist friends that trigger an idea or a way of seeing something differently. When I teach I am constantly questioning how and why I do things, and seeing work that moves me.

What is the most memorable exhibition or artwork you have seen and why?
Oh wow, so many!!! I think drawings always have a huge impact on me because they feel almost egoless and perhaps an insight into a private moment with the artist. I saw Edward Hopper’s drawings at the Whitney in 2013 which took my breath away which I was really not expecting, as did Kathe Kowoltz at the Brooklyn Museum, they brought me to tears. The Louise Bourgeois exhibition at Heide was incredibly powerful and clarifying for me.

Erika’s website

Listen to the This Wild Song podcast featuring Erika Gofton:

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